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Man Hunt: Education Worksheet

Man Hunt Education Worksheet

EPISODES IN THIS SERIES
Kill to Survive, Death Blow, Sharp Teeth Nomads, Kalahari Killers

EDUCATION SHEET EPISODE
Kill to Survive

SCHOOL LEVEL
Upper Primary and Junior Secondary

EDUCATION DESCRIPTION: Kill to Survive
Immerse yourself in Vanuatu’s beautiful, unspoiled Tanna Island with Australian narrator, Hayden Turner, as he accompanies the local Namal tribe on their daily hunting expeditions. The success of the expeditions – intensely physically challenging for Turner, second nature to the hunters – determines whether or not the tribal families will eat, or go hungry. Using strategies developed over thousands of years, the hunters demonstrate incredible strength and skill. They share with Turner their invaluable knowledge of animal behavior, which helps them predict their quarry’s movements. The documentary also reveals how the Namal live in harmony with nature, taking only what they need, thereby improving their tribe’s prospects of enjoying a sustainable lifestyle.


TEACHER BACKGROUND INFORMATION
Around the world, it is becoming increasingly difficult to find places where men still hunt traditionally and sustainably, relying simply on their instincts, and on tools hand-crafted from nature. Remote Tanna Island in Vanuatu, located in the Pacific Ocean between Australia and Fiji, is one of these places.

Conservationist Hayden Turner has dedicated his life to saving animals. But now he’s on the hunt, because he wants to understand the human predator’s mind and hunting strategies. For millions of years, humans lived a hunter-gatherer lifestyle. Chasing and killing animals was a matter of survival, and understanding animal behaviour in the natural world was an intrinsic part of life.

While the western world grows increasingly urbanised and disconnected from food origins, Tanna Island’s Namal people hunt every creature on their island – whether it swims, crawls, runs or flies – having developed innovative ways to catch them over the centuries. If extra strength is needed, the hunters make a special pilgrimage to Mt Yasur, a fiery, active volcano, where they literally absorb energy from the earth.

Turner’s first hunt is for wild pig – intelligent, adaptable, dangerous animals with excellent senses of hearing and smell. Each hunter’s spear is custom-made for the job and for the hunter’s height and reach. Spotting pig tracks is easy for the hunters, finding pigs in the thick jungle more challenging, and surrounding them for the kill almost impossible.

On Tanna Island, the forest looks after the Namal and they look after the forest. Although flying fox is a delicacy and a favourite source of food, they are hunted for just six months of the year, giving the populations a chance to recover. Hunting them requires a head of heights, as men scale trees to 20 metres and beyond, building platforms from which to launch their deadly spears.

In this gripping documentary, Turner weaves geography with science to showcase the challenges and rewards of a traditional, sustainable, hunter-gather lifestyle in a natural environment relatively untouched by the modern world.


CURRICULUM POINTERS


Upper Primary Curriculum
Geography teaching nurtures students’ curiosity about places and the differences between them. It responds to their wonder about the world and its diversity, and teaches them how to explore this world directly through fieldwork and indirectly through other types of investigation.
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011: Introduction

The science curriculum provides opportunities for students to develop understandings about science and its processes, the scope of its contributions to our culture and society, and its applications in our daily lives.
Australian Science K-10 Curriculum 2010: Rationale

Junior Secondary Curriculum
Geography answers our questions about why places have their particular environmental and human characteristics; how and why these characteristics vary from place to place; how places are connected, and how and why they are changing. Geography examines these questions on all scales, from the local to the global, and over time periods that range from a few years to thousands of years. It also looks forward to explore ways of influencing and managing the future of places including their environmental, economic and social sustainability.
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011: Introduction

The science curriculum provides opportunities for students to experience the joy of scientific discovery and to nurture students’ natural curiosity about the world around them.
Australian Science K-10 Curriculum 2010: Rationale


CURRICULUM OUTCOMES

Upper Primary
In undertaking these tasks, students of Geography will:
•    Develop a sense of wonder, curiosity, knowledge and interest about the variety of
environments, peoples, cultures and places that exist throughout the world
•    Explore and gain a good understanding of geographical thinking including its perspectives, concepts and ways of explaining.
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011: Aims

In undertaking these tasks, students of Science will develop:
•    an interest in science and a curiosity and willingness to explore, ask questions and speculate about the changing world in which they live
•    an ability to communicate their scientific understandings and findings to a range of audiences
Australian Science K-10 Curriculum 2010: Aims

Junior Secondary
In undertaking these tasks, students of Geography will:
•    Explore and gain a good understanding of geographical thinking including its perspectives, concepts and ways of explaining
•    Become thoughtful and active local, national and global citizens, and … understand how they can influence the futures of places
Shape of the Australian Geography Curriculum 2011: Aims


In undertaking these tasks, students of Science will develop:
•    an ability to solve problems and make informed, evidence-based decisions about current and future applications of science while taking into account moral, ethical and social implications
•    an understanding of historical and cultural aspects of science as well as contemporary science issues and activities
Australian Science K-10 Curriculum 2010: Aims


STUDENT LEARNING TASKS

Upper Primary

Task 1
Download a map of Vanuatu from
http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/vanuatu-map/
Click on the map until it’s large enough for you to see the names of the islands, then save the map to your files, or print it and paste it into your workbook.

On your map:
•    Highlight Tanna Island.
•    Highlight the capital of Vanuatu
•    Name the ocean in which Vanuatu is found
•    Calculate the approximate distance between your home town and Tanna Island
•    Write down the area of the islands of Vanuatu in square kilometres
•    Write down the population of Vanuatu.
Note: you can get help for some of these answers by clicking on “Facts” just above the map.

Task 2
Name three different animals that the Namal tribe hunt on Tanna Island. For each of these animals, state their habitat (where they live), when the animals are active, and what they eat.

Task 3
Choose one of the animals and describe in 50 words how the Namal hunt it. Make sure you include a description of the weapon or weapons that are used. Draw a picture of your animal and weapon.

Task 4
Flying fox is said to be the Namal people’s favourite meat, but they only hunt it for six months of the year. In 50 words explain why this is so, and what would happen to flying fox on the island if the Namal did not obey this rule.

Task 5
Write 60 words to describe a typical day in the life of a Namal boy or girl of your age. Now write 60 words to describe a typical day in your life. Include the following elements:
•    Food
•    House
•    Activities


Junior Secondary

Task 1
Download a map of Vanuatu from
http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/vanuatu-map/
Click on the map until it’s large enough for you to see the names of the islands, then save the map to your files, or print it and paste it into your workbook.

On your map:
•    Highlight Tanna Island.
•    Highlight the capital of Vanuatu
•    Name the ocean in which Vanuatu is found
•    Calculate the approximate distance between your home town and Tanna Island
•    Write down the area of the islands of Vanuatu in square kilometres
•    Write down the population of Vanuatu
•    Write a list of three different industries found in Vanuatu
•    Write a list of three products that are farmed in Vanuatu
•    Write a list of three products exported from Vanuatu.
•    Write down how many different languages are spoken in Vanuatu.
Note: you can get help for some of these answers by clicking on “Facts” just above the map.

Task 2
Imagine you are visiting the Namal tribe on Tanna Island and they invite you to go pig hunting with them. Write down five important rules you should remember while you are on the hunt. Write about 20 words for each rule to explain why it is important.

Task 3
Describe what kind of weapons the Namal people use to hunt each of the following animals:
•    wild pigs
•    flying foxes
•    eels
In your description of 50 words for each weapon, explain how each type of weapon is made or designed to suit the animal being hunted, and how the hunter uses it. Draw a picture of each of these weapons.

Task 4
Chose one of the animals from Task 3 and write 100 words to describe how the Namal use their knowledge of its behaviour to help them hunt it successfully.

Task 5
Write a list of 10 major differences between the hunter-gatherer lifestyle of the Namal and the way you live. Then write a paragraph to explain which lifestyle is more sustainable and why.
 

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